Smallest url shortener service

Smallest url shortener service

Smallest ever three alphabet url shortner ever to shorten urls with minimal alphabet characters

Shorten URL service
http://to./ is the most recent, mind blowing, very effective, shortest url shortening service ever launched. Making up just three alphabet characters to. including the TLD, this url shortening is nothing les than baffling. Two letter TLD s are the shortest TLD s approved by ICANN. http://to./ can be the shortest ever url shortening service. With http://bit.ly being one of the smallest and most popular url generating service, http://to./ beats it by almost three characters. Interestingly to. is just only half the length of bit.ly .

Smallest URL shortner
With it being newly launched url shortening service, one gets the potential to have his / her domain name / web address shortened to the most minimal form ever. http://darkwap.mobi gets shortened to http://to./zum which means saving about 5 characters in length in comparison. Indirectly meaning saving five keystrokes. In accordance with the present norms of ICANN, nothing can get more shorter than this. Popularity is something this url shortening service will inevitably get. Internet addresses are worth a shortening with this shortner. Lets save some character key strokes.

A little more info
.to is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) of the island kingdom of Tonga. The government of Tonga sells domains in its ccTLD to any interested party. Since * to * is a common English preposition, it became popular to craft memorable URLs called domain hacks that take advantage of this and ultimately it has supplemented a great url shortner service. To is the perfect preposition for direction and put to best of use here.

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Smallest ever url shortner ever to shorten urls with minimal alphabet characters

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